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  1. #1
    Cosimo is offline Novice
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    Coverting old Access 2003 database - Part II

    As I mentioned in an earlier post, I have an Access database I built over a period of years. I started the database in Access 2.0 and continue to build the database in Access 2003.



    I retired the database almost twenty years ago, but recently I decided to convert it to a more recent version of Access so I can use it again.

    I had a copy of Access 2007 which I installed and used to convert the database from mdb format to accdb format.

    I had a few minor issues, which I seem to have resolved.

    I would still like to convert the database to a more recent version of Access, a version that is still supported by Microsoft.

    And I am unsure of the next steps.

    First, was it a mistake to use Access 2007 as the first step in the conversion process?

    I ask because 2007 was the first Access version offering conversion of mdb to accdb. So I'm wondering if there might have been some bugs in the conversion process that MS fixed in Access 2010.

    Should I obtain and use Access 2010 to do the conversion over again from scratch (which I don't mind doing if that's the surest way to do the job right)?

    And if so, should I first uninstall Office 2007 Professional or just install Office 2010 Pro. over Office 2007 Pro?

  2. #2
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    I think 2007 is the lowest version to convert mdb.?
    I have done so for various people who had 2010 and up, and could not do it themselves.
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  3. #3
    June7's Avatar
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    I can open MDB in Access 2010 and save as ACCDB with the "Save and Publish" option.

    What issues did you encounter? A 2010 conversion will likely have same issues.
    How to attach file: http://www.accessforums.net/showthread.php?t=70301 To provide db: copy, remove confidential data, run compact & repair, zip w/Windows Compression.

  4. #4
    Micron is offline Virtually Inert Person
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    Pretty sure Islagogs has mentioned this before, so I'll say that converting by using 2007 was the right move. You should be able to upgrade all the way to the most recent version you can install. However, I would keep each converted file in a backup folder - never convert the only version you have in cases something goes wrong. You might have some fixing to do wrt outdated references (Access should take care of those) or code that could fail because the syntax isn't quite right but you got away with it. We've seen app updates do that from time to time.
    The more we hear silence, the more we begin to think about our value in this universe.
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  5. #5
    Cosimo is offline Novice
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    Quote Originally Posted by Micron View Post
    Pretty sure Islagogs has mentioned this before, so I'll say that converting by using 2007 was the right move. You should be able to upgrade all the way to the most recent version you can install. However, I would keep each converted file in a backup folder - never convert the only version you have in cases something goes wrong. You might have some fixing to do wrt outdated references (Access should take care of those) or code that could fail because the syntax isn't quite right but you got away with it. We've seen app updates do that from time to time.
    Thank you, Micron.

    I back up continually.

    Now that my database seems to run OK in Access 2007 after conversion from mdb to accdb format, what should I do next on the way to being able to use and modify my database in a version of MS Access that Microsoft still supports?

    Right now, I believe Access 2016 is the oldest version that MS still supports (until 2025); should I acquire and install MS Access 2016 next, or should I first install an intermediate Access version, like Access 2013?

  6. #6
    June7's Avatar
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    Don't need to buy 2013/2016 before moving on to later versions. Buying 2010 or 2013 as intermediate to 2016 or later is waste.

    Can continue with 2007 if it has features you use and don't want to lose (like Collect Data and MS-Graph and pivot tables/charts) - at least until you develop replacements for those features. Although since you just converted from 2003, 2 of those probably weren't available.

    So, jump to 2021 or 365 unless you want to wait for next desktop version.
    How to attach file: http://www.accessforums.net/showthread.php?t=70301 To provide db: copy, remove confidential data, run compact & repair, zip w/Windows Compression.

  7. #7
    Micron is offline Virtually Inert Person
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    Since you asked me directly, I'll second all of that! If I was going to move from mdb created in anything prior to 2007 to accde I'd do that then move to the latest app version that suited me or the organization. No need to do it in steps AFAIK.
    The more we hear silence, the more we begin to think about our value in this universe.
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  8. #8
    Cosimo is offline Novice
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    Quote Originally Posted by June7 View Post
    Don't need to buy 2013/2016 before moving on to later versions. Buying 2010 or 2013 as intermediate to 2016 or later is waste.

    Can continue with 2007 if it has features you use and don't want to lose (like Collect Data and MS-Graph and pivot tables/charts) - at least until you develop replacements for those features. Although since you just converted from 2003, 2 of those probably weren't available.

    So, jump to 2021 or 365 unless you want to wait for next desktop version.
    Thank you.

    Unfortunately, I cannot stay with Access 2007 because I have to use a supported version of Access on my business PC for insurance purposes. So it sounds like I'll go straight to 2016.

    When Access 2016 is no longer supported (I think that will be in 2026) then I'll go to the next version that is supported.

  9. #9
    Cosimo is offline Novice
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    Quote Originally Posted by Micron View Post
    Since you asked me directly, I'll second all of that! If I was going to move from mdb created in anything prior to 2007 to accde I'd do that then move to the latest app version that suited me or the organization. No need to do it in steps AFAIK.
    OK, thank you. That will make it all easier!

  10. #10
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    isladogs is offline MVP / VIP
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    Just to add my POV. As 2016 will reach end of support in the next year or so, I wouldn't bother with that either.
    Suggest you download a trial copy of 365. You have 30 days to evaluate it before you need to start paying anything.

    The latest versions can still open & convert any Access db from A2000 MDB format onwards so if necessary you can run the conversion again from your original file
    Colin, Access MVP, Website, email
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  11. #11
    Cosimo is offline Novice
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    Quote Originally Posted by isladogs View Post
    Just to add my POV. As 2016 will reach end of support in the next year or so, I wouldn't bother with that either.
    Suggest you download a trial copy of 365. You have 30 days to evaluate it before you need to start paying anything.

    The latest versions can still open & convert any Access db from A2000 MDB format onwards so if necessary you can run the conversion again from your original file
    Thank you, but isn't office 365 cloud based and a subscription service? I haven't yet decided whether or when I want to deal with all that and what I suspect will be an even greater learning curve to get up to speed.

    I have way too much on my plate right now as it is. I can pick up a licensed copy of Access 2016 on ebay for ~$50 to get me going with what I need ASAP.

    In my spare time over the next year I can plan for what I'll do after 2016 is no longer supported; but in the meanwhile I'll be able to put my database back into service.

  12. #12
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    isladogs is offline MVP / VIP
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    Office 365 is a subscription service but it consists of desktop apps as in 2016 plus lots of additional cloud based services.
    There would be no additional learning curve in using 365 compared to 2016
    However, its your choice
    Colin, Access MVP, Website, email
    The more I learn, the more I know I don't know. When I don't know, I keep quiet!
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  13. #13
    Micron is offline Virtually Inert Person
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    "Microsoft 365" is not cloud based but it is subscription based. You do get 1 (?) TB of storage on One Drive but that's as close as it gets. I've been using 365 for 8 years and AFAIK, Access does not come with 365, it is separate and I had to add it on. At least that is the case with Family/Personal/Student subscriptions. Other subscriptions (e.g. professional or whatever) might include Access - I don't know but you could research the whole subject.
    The more we hear silence, the more we begin to think about our value in this universe.
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  14. #14
    isladogs's Avatar
    isladogs is offline MVP / VIP
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    Almost all 365 subscriptions include Access. Family and Personal both include it. IIRC the Student version doesn't include Access

  15. #15
    Micron is offline Virtually Inert Person
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    It's not shown in the icons but it is in the list of apps. How odd.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The more we hear silence, the more we begin to think about our value in this universe.
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